Click on the titles below to see additional information about the current CBMP course offerings:

MSCBMP 2800 MS Thesis Research (1-14 credits): A directed research project which results in a thesis for a Masters Degree.  All semesters
Course Director: Donna Beer Stolz, Ph.D.

MSCBMP 2840 Regulation of Membrane Traffic (2 credits): The focus of this course is to analyze membrane/protein traffic along both the biosynthetic and endocytic pathways.  The general goal is to teach students how to read and interpret the literature. The course is updated each year to include topics in which new and interesting developments have occurred. Emphasis is placed on how membrane traffic is regulated and how it is disrupted or subverted during disease processes.  Alternating Summer semesters
Course Directors: Gerard L. Apodaca, Ph.D. and Ora A. Weisz, Ph.D.
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MSCBMP 2860 Mutliparametric Microscopic Imaging (3 credits): This course offers an introduction to the optical imaging modalities commonly used in biomedical research. Students will learn the science behind many types of light and electron microscopy techniques, as well as a variety of tissue and cell processing for each technology. Summer semesters.
Course Directors: Donna Beer Stolz, Ph.D. and Claudette M. St. Croix, Ph.D.
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MSCBMP 2870 Histology (5 credits): The objective of lecture/lab course is student comprehension of the relationship between cell structure and organ function, and the application of the knowledge to the identification of light and electron microscopic images of cells and organs. Spring semesters.
Course Director: Georgia K. Duker, Ph.D.
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MSCBMP 2875 Experiments and Logic in Cell Biology (1 credit): The purpose of Experiments and Logic in Cell Biology (ELCB) is to engage the students of the Cell and Molecular Physiology Graduate Program in a self-directed seminar structured to stimulate the students’ ability to think scientifically and critically as future scientists. The iterative, collaborative, and collegial process of ELCB is the same used by teams of collaborating scientists use to develop and solve biomedical projects. Fall and Spring semesters.
Course Directors: Peter F. Drain, Ph.D. and Donna Beer Stolz, Ph.D.
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MSCBMP 2880 Cell Biology of Normal & Disease States (4 credits): This course is required for all CBMP graduate students.  It is taught through both lecture and in class discussion of primary literature and explores the cellular basis of multiple disease states.  At the end of the course students will have an increased understanding of normal cellular function and how research in cell biology can lead to a deeper understanding of diseases that impact millions of people each year. Spring semesters.
Course Director: Gerard L. Apodaca, Ph.D.
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MSCBMP 2885 Imaging Cell Biology in Living Systems (3 credits): The focus of this course is to study relevant problems in Cell Biology, Immunology, Developmental Biology and Neurobiology and how they have been solved using imaging approaches. The course will follow a Lecture/Demo/Journal Club format. Lectures will be interspersed with a journal club discussion of a relevant paper on each technology. Spring semesters.
Course Director: Simon C. Watkins, Ph.D.
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MSCBMP 2890 Directed Study (1-9 credits):  This course provides the student an opportunity to carry out specific laboratory projects in any area of interest in cell biology or physiology. All semesters.
Course Director: Donna Beer Stolz, Ph.D.

MSCBMP 2895 Cellular Physiology of the Kidney (2 credits): This summer course will provide an introduction to the kidney and lower urinary tract, with emphasis on kidney structure and function. The course, which meets once a week (two hours each session), will be taught through both lecture and in class discussion of the primary literature. Discussion of how bench top findings can be translated to treatments in the clinic will be facilitated by a diverse faculty that includes both basic and physician scientists. You will first learn about the specialized cell types that comprise the kidney and lower urinary tract. Subsequently, you will be introduced to renal stem cells and how they lead to kidney development. Next, you will learn the functions of the kidney, including regulation of water and ion balance. This will be followed by a discussion of the lower urinary tract. Finally, you will learn how drugs can be used to treat kidney dysfunction and how kidney transplants can be used to treat those patients with end-stage renal disease. Summer semesters.
Course Director: Gerard L. Apodaca, Ph.D.

MSCBMP 3800 PhD Dissertation Research (1-14 credits): After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of the doctoral dissertation.  A minimum of forty credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine.  All semesters.
Course Director: Donna Beer Stolz, Ph.D.

MSCBMP 3840 Reproductive Development from Model Organisms to Humans (2 credits): This course focuses on the molecular aspects of the transition from gamete to a reproductive organism.  The course progresses through the building of germ cells, fertilization and stem cell participation to sex determination, gonad morphogenesis, puberty, menopause and pregnancy.  This course highlights both human and model organisms to bring together diverse aspects of the cell and developmental biology of reproductive tissues and their impact on disease pathology.  Fall semesters.
Course Directors: Jennifer Condon-Jeyasuria, Ph.D. and Judith Yanowitz, Ph.D.
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After passing the comprehensive exam, students are required to participate in one of four ongoing journal clubs each term. The clubs including the following:

MSCBMP 2852 Research Seminar in Cellular Biological Membrane Trafficking (1 credit): Advanced research seminar with a journal club format specializing in current aspects of membrane trafficking. Fall and Spring semesters.
Course Director: Gerard L. Apodaca, Ph.D.

MSCBMP 2853 Research Seminar in Reproductive Physiology (1 credit):  Advanced research seminar with a journal club format specializing in current aspects of reproductive physiology. Fall and Spring term.
Course Director: William H. Walker, Ph.D.

MSCBMP 2855 Research Seminar in Molecular Physiology (1 credit): Advanced research seminar with a journal club format specializing in current aspects of molecular and cellular physiology.  Fall and Spring semesters.
Course Director: Thomas R. Kleyman, M.D.

MSCBMP 3835 DNA Repair Journal Club (1 credit):  This course is a journal club on current topics in DNA repair as it relates to human disease, DNA damage processing, genome stability, telomere biology, cancer and aging.  Fall and Spring semesters.
Course Directors: Robert Sobol, PhD